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Boil Water Notice
Update for Thursday, June, 23, 2016 12:00 PM

The boil water notice issued June 20th has been lifted effective immediately. Multiple tests returned negative, and the water is now safe to drink without boiling. Please run water through all plumbing fixtures for several minutes until water is clear. Homeowners should do the following:

  • Flush household pipes/faucets first: To flush your plumbing, run all your cold water faucets on full for at least 5 minutes each. If your service connection is long or complex (like in an apartment building) consider flushing for a longer period. Your building superintendent or landlord should be able to advise you on longer flushing times.

  • Automatic ice makers: Dump existing ice and flush the water feed lines by making and discarding three batches of ice cubes. Wipe down the ice bin with a disinfectant. If your water feed line to the machine is longer than 20 feet, increase to five batches.

  • Hot water heaters, water coolers, in line filters, and other appliances with direct water connections or water tanks: Run enough water to completely replace at least one full volume of all lines and tanks. If your filters are near the end of their life, replace them.

  • Water softeners: Run through a regeneration cycle.

  • Reverse Osmosis (RO) units: Replace pre-filters, check owner's manual.

  • Replace other water filters, as they are disposable and may be contaminated. This applies especially to carbon filters and others that are near the end of their life.


Update For Tuesday, June 21, 2016, 5:00 PM

The precautionary boil water order is still in effect at this time. It will be in effect until Thursday, June 23rd. Customers will be immediately notified once the notice is rescinded. Notifications will go out via CodeRed (robocall), social media, the town website and through various news outlets. Residents may also call 727-518-3043 to check on the status of the order.

Statewide rules mandate testing for bacteriological materials anytime there is a loss of system pressure. This requires 24-48 hours to complete, depending on the type of test required. Once two samples remain negative for contaminants for the required period, the order will then be lifted.


Notice For Monday, June 20, 2016
Utilities crews work on water main break in Town of Belleair

The Town of Belleair Water crews are working to divert water flow from a potable water force main.

The Town will issue updates as soon as they become available.

To reduce pressure on the water force main, all town residents are being asked to avoid unnecessary use of water. There is a boil water notice at this time.


Boil Water Notice

Commonly Asked Questions Regarding Boil Water Advisories


1. What is the proper way to disinfect my water so that it is safe to drink?

The preferred method of treatment is boiling. Boiling water kills harmful bacteria and parasites (freezing will not disinfect water). Bring water to a full rolling boil for at least 1 minute to kill most infectious organisms (germs). For areas without power, disinfect the tap water by adding 8 drops, about 1/8 teaspoon, of plain unscented household bleach per gallon of water and allow the water to stand for 30 minutes. If the water is cloudy, repeat the procedure. Use a container that has a cap or cover for disinfecting and storing water to be used for drinking. This will prevent contamination. If your well was flooded, boiling the water is the safest action, since disinfection does not kill certain parasites.

2. How should I wash my hands during a boil water advisory?
Based on the current conditions of the affected public water supplies, vigorous hand washing with soap and your tap water is safe for basic personal hygiene. If you are washing your hands to prepare food, if at all possible, you should use boiled (then cooled) water, disinfected or bottled water with hand washing soap.

3. Is potentially contaminated water (where Cryptosporidium is not the significant contaminant) safe for washing dishes or clothes?
Yes, if you rinse hand-washed dishes for a minute in a bleach solution (1 tablespoon bleach per gallon of water). Allow dishes to completely air dry. Most household dishwashers do not reach the proper temperature to sanitize dishes. It is safe to wash clothes in tap water.

4. Is potentially contaminated water safe for bathing and shaving?
The water may be used for showering, baths, shaving and washing, so long as care is taken not to swallow or allow water in eyes or nose or mouth. Children and disabled individuals should have their bath supervised to ensure water is not ingested. The time spent bathing should be minimized. Though the risk of illness is minimal, individuals who have recent surgical wounds, are immunosuppressed, or have a chronic illness may want to consider using bottled or boiled water for cleansing until the advisory is lifted.

5. How should I wash fruit and vegetables and make ice?
Fruits and vegetables should be washed with boiled (then cooled water) or bottled water or water sanitized with 8 drops (about 1/8 teaspoon) of unscented household bleach per gallon of water. Ice should be made with boiled water, bottled water or sanitized water.

6. What if I have already consumed potentially contaminated water?
Even if someone has consumed potentially contaminated water from either a public water system or a private well before they were aware of the boil water advisory, the likelihood of becoming ill is low. Anyone experiencing symptoms such as diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, abdominal cramps, with or without fever, should seek medical attention.

7. What infectious organisms might be present in contaminated water? 
Disease transmission from contaminated water occurs principally by ingesting water. The major organisms of concern are protozoa such as Giardia and Cryptosporidium, and bacteria, such as Shigella, E. coli and viruses. These organisms primarily affect the gastrointestinal system, causing diarrhea, abdominal cramps, nausea, and vomiting with or without fever. Most of these illnesses are not usually serious or life threatening except in the elderly, the very young or those who are immunocompromised.


Information provided by, and reproduced from the Florida Department of Environmental Protection.

8. What should homeowners do when the boil water notice is lifted?
  • Flush household pipes/faucets first: To flush your plumbing, run all your cold water faucets on full for at least 5 minutes each. If your service connection is long or complex (like in an apartment building) consider flushing for a longer period. Your building superintendent or landlord should be able to advise you on longer flushing times.

  • Automatic ice makers: Dump existing ice and flush the water feed lines by making and discarding three batches of ice cubes. Wipe down the ice bin with a disinfectant. If your water feed line to the machine is longer than 20 feet, increase to five batches.

  • Hot water heaters, water coolers, in line filters, and other appliances with direct water connections or water tanks: Run enough water to completely replace at least one full volume of all lines and tanks. If your filters are near the end of their life, replace them.

  • Water softeners: Run through a regeneration cycle.

  • Reverse Osmosis (RO) units: Replace pre-filters, check owner's manual.

  • Replace other water filters, as they are disposable and may be contaminated. This applies especially to carbon filters and others that are near the end of their life.




Belleair Florida
901 Ponce de Leon Blvd.
Belleair, FL 33756
Ph: (727) 588-3769
   Fx: (727) 588-3778
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